Ksubi goes ‘Big in Japan’

This month saw the launch of the Australian ‘Big in Japan’ cultural exchange program- an idea built by Ksubi for iconic Japanese beer brand, Kirin. This digital and experiential based series, showcasing Japanese and Australian creative talent will be curated by the Ksubi collective and is a snapshot of incredible culture consistently evolving between the two countries.

The name is coined from the iconic tongue-in-cheek term ‘Big in Japan’ which was a phrase originally applied to rock bands that failed to sell many records in the US and UK during the 1060’s and 70’s, despite the fact that they were ‘Big in Japan’. Since then, the term has found its home in contemporary lingo as a statement applied to brands, musicians, artists and films while they are teetering on the verge of international recognition.

Alongside this program, Ksubi erected a home-away-from-home exhibition in Japan. The bright blue, plastic home was inspired by the hand built shelters of the homeless people of Tokyo’s streets. The installation ‘Home Honey, I’m Hi!’, high up on the 5th floor of department store ‘Cannibus’ in Japan, reflects both the Japanese obsession for material comforts and our desire for a simpler, hassle free existence. Post exhibition, the installation became Ksubi’s second ever ‘Pop-up Store’.

Check out the great pics below and also the Big in Japan blog ( www.biginjapan.com.au) which is also curated by Ksubi and edited by Japanese contemporary culture writer Amelia Groom, along with several other local and Japanese contributors.

Ksubi

"Big in Japan"

This month saw the launch of the Australian ‘Big in Japan’ cultural exchange programme- an idea built by Ksubi for iconic Japanese beer brand, Kirin. This digital and experiential based series, showcasing Japanese and Australian creative talent will be curated by the Ksubi collective and is a snapshot of incredible culture consistently evolving between the two countries.

The name is coined from the iconic tongue-in-cheek term ‘Big in Japan’ which was a phrase originally applied to rock bands that failed to sell many records in the US and UK during the 1060’s and 70’s, despite the fact that they were ‘Big in Japan’. Since then, the term has found its home in contemporary lingo as a statement applied to brands, musicians, artists and films while they are teetering on the verge of international recognition.

Alongside this programme, Ksubi erected a home-away-from-home exhibition in Japan. The bright blue, plastic home was inspired by the hand built shelters of the homeless people of Tokyo’s streets. The installation ‘Home Honey, I’m Hi!’, high up on the 5th floor of department store ‘Cannibus’ in Japan, reflects both the Japanese obsession for material comforts and our desire for a simpler, hassle free existance. Post exhibition, the installation became  Ksubi’s second ever ‘Pop-up Store’.

Check out the great pics below and also the Big in Japan blog ( www.biginjapan.com.au) which is also curated by Ksubi and edited by Japanese contemporary culture writer Amelia Groom, along with several other local and Japanese contributors.

 

honey
honey2
honey3

 

Therese Rawsthorne

The “borrowed-from-your-boyfriend” dictum that gave us last seasons baggy cuffed jeans, and the oversized blazer is outfitting us for summer with the shirt.

Forget tailored, the classic and simple look of the ‘boyfriend’ shirt is a long-standing staple for summer. Fresh and easy going, this look is both timeless and versatile- Wear over your bikini, or paired with your favourite cut-offs.

We like this billowy and breezy ‘Painters Shirt’ by Therese Rawsthorne (due in-store September) as seen in the latest Fashion Quarterly.

 

Painters Shirt

 

| More

Bassike

Superette hearts Bassike.

And this pretty earthy editorial make us love it even more ( as well as making us wish summer would hurry up already!)

Bassike’s first drop of summer has already arrived so come and check it out! 

 

1
2
3
4

 

| More

Deadly Ponies

Deadly Ponies: Hathor’s Revenge, Spring/Summer 2009

Part mythological, part imaginary character ‘Hathor’ forms the basis of the inspiration behind Deadly Ponies Spring/Summer collection. A juxtaposition between Hathor, the powerful Egyptian goddess and a 21st century Hathor- living in a ramshackle home, surrounded by cats, falcons and spider webs.

Bats have unwrapped their wings to display themselves on bags, falcons have flown from their steeples to lift up baby Mailman’s and carry them off to the nearest shoulder. Black cats usually at Hathor’s side have knotted themselves around the nearest neck and waists.

A transition between the Egyptian Beauty to a modern day mess… Beware of Hathor this season because she is hungry for REVENGE!!

Deadly Ponies first drop is available in store and online now!

sp
SD
hh

 

| More